Sunday, August 28, 2011

My recent leadership training...















Having been in the military and learned a lot about leadership, so I'd like to spend a couple of blogs, sharing some of what I have learned, practiced and successfully translated into the civilian world for you.

As a LEADER you have to be passionate about developing others.

Your goal as a leader is to teach your folks that whatever setbacks they experience, they are not permanent, are temporary setbacks, and not to be taken personal.

Your ability to help them take reasonable risks, and to take positive, constructive action, even accepting the consequences of their behavior, learning to course correct, and course correct again.. but never giving up is success.

Achieving success comes from working through one's value system, and imparting our character.

The word, “character” is from a Latin root that means “engraved”.

A life, like a block of granite can either be carved with care or hacked at with reckless disregard.

In the end it will either be a masterpiece or just a marred piece of rubble.

There are six elements that I believe strongly make a great leader:

Courage,

Loyalty,

Diligence,

Modesty,

Honesty and

Gratitude.

I am sure there are many more but these are the ones I live by.

A type of genuine, spontaneous act of self-sacrificial concern for the defenseless.

It is the willingness to act out of conviction rather than of feeling.

I have seen both, leaders who felt quite fearless but act in a cowardly fashion and others who were fearful but always behaved with incredible courage.

Courageous leaders inspire their people and teams to achieve incredible new heights.

It's the foundation for creating teams of 212 degree thinkers, of the “will do” and “must do” kind of people.
Next is loyalty, but sometimes we wonder where all the loyalty went?

Loyalty is the very fabric of community. Relationships can't be bought, bribed or will prosper if there is no trust to glue the feeling of mutuality of commitment.

Loyalty is the willingness to deflect praise, admiration and success onto others without hesitating.

It is a two-way street and must function both upwardly and downwardly.

Have you ever been in a situation where you had to willing allow your boss to take the credit while sometimes taking the blame?

Another important character ingredient is diligence.

There are no short cuts, quickest, or easiest ways to producing the greatest returns.

To achieve anything worthwhile you must understand that there are no substitutes for hard work.

You have top lead by example, be a steady performer, remembering that the steady performer is a finisher.

Great leaders are accountable and take their obligations and responsibilities seriously.

One needs to be held accountable and follow-through on all of our obligations.
Modesty to some of us may mean living within our limits.

Modest leaders see fiscal and operational constraints as safeguards and not hindrances.

They are the opposite of boldness and arrogance.

They are confident but they recognize that they are also not too good, too big, too powerful to be open to the views and perspective of others.

I've achieved a lot of great results and outcomes having adopted a more modest, calm and self-accepting approach when handling big challenges.
The next is honesty.

We can have a shrewd business sense but it is very different from a dishonest one.

However, it is not nearly as fine as we think.

Honesty has always helped me build relationships, teamwork, and open and positive energy.

Sure I have missed out on a deal because I chose to not allow my people to use deception to win.

We are tasked to create an environment in which we promote a truthful, above-board, honest existence.

My blog has always spoken to gratitude. I have great respect and appreciation for both the positive and negative experiences I have lived.

At my core I understand that the very essence of who I am is inextricably tied to the sum of those very experiences.

It is sometimes a batting average.

Where we are unwilling to see the value in experiencing setbacks.

Gratitude teaches us to be appreciative when the “hit” actually occurs.

Gratitude is providing praise and recognition to others in a selfless way.

To show honest gratitude to everyone that you lead, and watch them grow and develop into the best that they are capable of becoming.

Make it a great leadership kind of día!